Scrotal Hematoma Complications | Living with Scrotal Hematoma


Living With A Testicular Hematoma

Hi 6 months ago I was hit in the testicles by a soccer ball and formed a tennis ball size scrotal hematoma. because there was no circulation blockage to the testicles the doctor told me I should let it heal on its own. He also told me it could take 4-6 months to heal.

Well it has been 6 months and for the past 2 months the hematoma is now the size of a golf ball and I have seen no progress of the testicle getting smaller.  Is it possible I require a surgical removal? or some other form of treatment? Can somebody offer me some advice?

Check out this picture of a scrotal Hematoma.  Now that is a doozy.

Close-up Photo of Scrotal Hematoma

Close-up Photo of Scrotal Hematoma

This entry was posted in Hematoma Complications Blog, Scrotal Hematoma and tagged Hematoma Complication, hydrocele, scrotal hematoma, Scrotal Hematoma Complications, Scrotal Hematoma Photo, scrotal hematomas, subdural hematoma. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Scrotal Hematoma Complications | Living with Scrotal Hematoma

  1. admin says:

    Hi, I had a hematoma in 1999 after a vasectomy. Emergency surgery was performed to remove the blood clot. After this the scrotum did not completely close and the testicle felt like it was fixed to the scrotal skin.

    About a year later on my birthday I underwent emergency surgery to remove a necrotic left testicle due to a staph infection.

    You want to make sure that things are healin right and that there will be no complications. If the hematoma will be absorbed on it’s own that that is the best plan of treatment.

    All the best.

    John

  2. Pingback: Post Surgical Hematoma

  3. admin says:

    Thanks for your comments on your experience with Scrotal Hematoma’s

  4. admin says:

    Some people wanted to know what a hydrocele is.

    I found this – a hydrocele is a fluid-filled sac surrounding a testicle that results in swelling of the scrotum, the loose bag of skin underneath the penis. Up to 10 percent of male infants have a hydrocele at birth, but most hydroceles disappear without treatment within the first year of life. Additionally, adult men can develop a hydrocele due to inflammation or injury within the scrotum.

    Hydroceles usually aren’t painful. Typically not harmful, hydroceles may require no treatment. However, if you have scrotal swelling, see your doctor to rule out other causes, such as testicular cancer or other conditions.

    This is very different from a Scrotal Hematoma, even through both do involve swelling of the testicles.

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