Acute epidural-like appearance of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma.

Acute epidural-like appearance of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma.

Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 2010;50(11):990-4

Authors: Prieto R, Pascual JM, Subhi-Issa I, Yus M

We report the exceptional case of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) in a 67-year-old woman that was admitted with acute hemiplegia followed by rapid deterioration in consciousness 5 months after a minor head trauma. Computed tomography (CT) showed an extracerebral biconvex shaped hyperdense mass that led to the misdiagnosis of an acute epidural hematoma. Urgent craniotomy revealed an encapsulated mass filled with solid fresh clot in the subdural space. Complete evacuation of this SDH, including both its inner and outer membranes, was achieved, and the patient recovered successfully. Histological analysis confirmed that the content of the hematoma corresponded to a newly formed clot that was enclosed between an inner membrane, composed of two collagen layers, and an outer membrane with a three layered structure. Chronic SDH may seldom present as an encapsulated solid non-organized lesion that consists of a fibrous capsule enclosing a fresh clot and lacking the thick fibrous septations that typically connect the inner and outer membranes of organized chronic SDH. This entity mimics the clinical course and radiological appearance of acute epidural hematomas and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extracerebral hyperdense biconvex shaped lesions.

PMID: 21123983 [PubMed - in process]

Novel method for emergency craniostomy for rapid control and monitoring of the intracranial pressure in severe acute subdural hematoma.

Novel method for emergency craniostomy for rapid control and monitoring of the intracranial pressure in severe acute subdural hematoma.

Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 2010;50(11):1039-44

Authors: Mihara Y, Dohi K, Nakamura S, Miyake Y, Aruga T

Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is a critical condition following the onset of traumatic brain injury, and it is essential to immediately reduce elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). Single burr hole surgery/twist drill craniostomy is commonly performed in patients with ASDH as an emergency surgical intervention, usually preceding decompressive craniotomy. A novel method using a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage catheter kit for rapid drainage of ASDH is described. Percutaneous twist drill craniostomy using a CAMINO(®) micro ventricular bolt pressure-temperature monitoring kit was performed in the emergency room in 12 patients with severe ASDH. The kit contained a closed-system CSF drainage and pressure-temperature monitoring catheter, which allowed aspiration of the hematoma and monitoring of the ICP. The tip of the catheter was inserted into the hematoma from the forehead. The mean initial ICP was 61 mmHg, with a range of 31 to 120 mmHg. The liquid hematoma was aspirated, and the ICP was temporarily controlled to the normal range. Pupil dilation recovered immediately after aspiration of the hematoma in 3 patients. No complications occurred either during or after the operation. This new method for craniostomy is easy, safe, and effective to monitor and rapidly control ICP in the emergency room. This technique also offers the possibility of evaluating the patient's prognosis and determining indications for further decompressive craniectomy by the continuation of ICP control under ICP monitoring and evaluation of the reversibility of pupillary findings in ASDH patients.

PMID: 21123995 [PubMed - in process]

Recurrent subdural hematoma from a pseudoaneurysm at the cortical branch of the middle cerebral artery after mild head injury.

Recurrent subdural hematoma from a pseudoaneurysm at the cortical branch of the middle cerebral artery after mild head injury.

Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 2011;51(3):217-21

Authors: Cho WS, Batchuluun B, Lee SJ, Kang HS, Kim JE

A 67-year-old man presented with a case of recurrent subdural hematomas (SDHs) from a pseudoaneurysm at the cortical artery after mild head trauma. He had undergone two episodes of burr hole trephination and evacuation of SDH in a 6-day interval. Review of previous imaging findings and additional cerebral angiography then identified a pseudoaneurysm arising from the precentral branch of the middle cerebral artery. Acute rebleeding suddenly occurred, and the leak point on the cortical artery was completely repaired with a single suture. SDH from pseudoaneurysm after mild head injury is very unusual. The high morbidity and mortality rates necessitate early detection, but the rarity of this type of injury makes detection difficult. If the clinical course is not easily explainable and is worse than the severity of trauma, repeated SDHs occur, or abnormal lesions and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage are identified, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging with contrast medium should be performed to identify the underlying cerebrovascular diseases and determine whether cerebral angiography is necessary.

PMID: 21441739 [PubMed - in process]